Posts Tagged With: Discover south east asia

June 6th – Day 18 – Temples, Facials and Flames

After yesterdays amazing temple experience at Angkor Wat and Bayon, we had another early start (this time at a leisurely 7am!) to go explore the famous Ta Prohm temple – made famous in the recent Tomb Raider movies.

The 7am start actually meant we could get breakfast in the hotel before the adventure – which was great because we headed out for almost 4 hours of temple exploring!  More temple photos follow:

Once we reached the end of the temple adventure, we all agreed we were ‘templed out’ and headed back to the hotel.  I needed to grab a little more cash to get through the last few bits and pieces, so I walked down the street to the ATM – around a 5 minute walk – but in 35c heat that was far enough! We’d been so lucky with the weather during the whole trip – it hardly rained at all, despite the ominous forecasts before we departed.  But the trade off for this was the humidity – the pre-rainy season is particularly humid and we regularly had 90-100% humidity and 35c temperatures on this trip – and believe me, 1000 year old temples aren’t air conditioned!

I decided to make use of the complimentary massage voucher we were given when we checked into the hotel and upgraded it to a package deal including a facial and oil massage, as an end of holiday treat.  I’ve never had a facial before, but hey – i’ll try anything once! It was actually quite a weird experience – particularly being left alone in the room with tomato slices on my face, and tomato juice dripping down into my eye.  Not sure that’s part of the usual experience, but it was interesting for sure!

Our next planned activity was at 5pm, so there was a bit of remaining time after the massage – I grabbed a small snack and beer by the swimming pool, then headed to my room to pack.  The trip is coming to an end, so I can be brutal with my packing – not sure I really needed 3 rain jackets, or 3 packs of suncream! I’m a chronic overpacker, so i’m quite impressed to have stayed under 14kg the whole trip.

At 5 we met as a group for one last organised activity, and headed into the Siem Reap town centre for a sort of farewell dinner.  Dek had arranged a private transfer for us with the hotels transport, but they got kind of lost and he ended up having to get out and get directions to get us to the place we’d booked.

Dinner was at Genevieve’s – a small locally run restaurant which is owned and run by an ex-pat Australian called Phil who welcomed us and was working the room talking to all the tables throughout dinner.  On the back of the menu is the story of Genevieve’s, and it was really interesting to read how it came to be.  The place is the second best reviewed restaurant in Siem Reap, and rightly so – the food was amazing! I ordered a Khmer curry (and spring rolls – because I hadn’t had enough on this trip !!) – which was wonderful, but did remind me very much of the Yellow curry I had cooked way back in Chiang Mai, which felt like a lifetime ago.

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Khmer Curry

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Angkor beer – one last time

Once dinner was done with, we jumped in tuktuks to head to our final G-adventures activity – a performance by the brilliant Cambodian Circus company, Phare.  The Cambodian Circus company runs an education program for underprivileged children in Cambodia and have well over 1200 students, training them in conventional education subjects as well as Circus skills – and over 150 of their students have subsequently progressed to become professional circus performers.

We made our way through the small Phare Boutique – where they had local handicrafts at fairly high prices.  Initially I dismissed this, but I spotted a Bayon head made of recycled paper which I really really liked, and ended up going back and paying way above the odds for it – but since the money goes towards the education program, I don’t feel bad about that!  There are definitely worse things I could have spent my money on (like facials with sliced tomato!)

The show itself was mesmerising – really high standard circus in an intimate venue.  The show only lasted an hour, but everyone in the audience seemed to thoroughly enjoy it and at the end, the cast came on stage for photo opportunities and donations.

And so ended our tour – we made our way back to the hotel, and arranged to meet as a group one final time at 8am before my tuktuk to the airport (my flight is first to depart).  It’s flown by, but also, it’s been way too short – there’s so much more to see in these amazing countries!

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My bag still closes!

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June 5th -Day 17 – Angkor Wat

There’s no denying that Angkor Wat is the headline on the itinerary for this trip.  It’s the largest religious site in the world and our last major visit before the end of the itinerary.

The most popular way to visit Angkor Wat is at sunrise, so we scheduled to this – which meant meeting at 4:45am for our trip out to the temple. We had to meet so early because at 5am we had to buy our tickets, to get to the site before the run began rising at 5:30.  Since the hotel didn’t open breakfast until 6, I grabbed a quick protein bar in my room, a rather refreshing shower and met with the group at 4:45, just in time to be introduced to our local guide in Siem Reap.

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Our 4:45am bus 

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Queueing to get our tickets

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My 3 day ticket, with stunning photo printed on there

We took the bus out to the ticket centre, where we queued up and had our photo taken.  The tickets are quite expensive ($40 for a 3 day ticket) and have photos printed onto them, so each of us had to present ourself even though the ticket price was included in the itinerary.

After we got our tickets, the bus driver raced with the rest of the tourists to head to the border of Angkor Wat, where we had to present our tickets to be allowed through the checkpoint.

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As the bus dropped us off, the sun was just creeping up

Once we got off the bus, the photo opportunities didn’t stop.  Rather than give you a blow by blow account, i’m going to let the photos and comments on those do the talking.

It was so hot inside Angkor Wat, and we spent around 2 hours exploring the site before it was time to head back to the hotel for breakfast.  It was hard to believe how much we’d achieved in just a few hours of the day – and there was plenty more to come! Since the weather forecast is bad for tomorrow, we tried to cram as much as possible into today.

I had a quick shower back at the hotel and then joined the rest of the group for breakfast before chilling out and regrouping at 10am to head to Bayon, the second most famous temple in the Siem Reap area.  Bayon is located inside an area known as Angkor Thom. On the way into Angkor Thom, we passed over one of the entry bridges which has 57 statues lining the side of the road, and came across a patch of monkeys including a particularly cheeky one who jumped onto someones motorcycle! Just as we finished photographing the monkeys, a group of Elephants paraded past. I’m not even making this up!

So yes, it was 10am and i’d been to the biggest temple in the world, seen sun rise, seen monkeys, elephants and we hadn’t even got to Bayon yet.  Again, click the photos for details:

I have to say, Bayon blew me away. I’ve been to Machu Picchu, but it had nothing on this in terms of impression it left in my brain.  Bayon is insane. It’s from another world. The faces, the structure and the presence of the whole place was something else.

Shortly after our tour of Bayon, we stopped for a toilet break. I dared to go look at one of the nearby stalls, and bought some postcards and a t-shirt from one of the vendors there.  The vendors are borderline aggressive in their sales technique and once i’d bought, they followed me to the coach and tried to convince everyone else to buy from them as well. The amounts they’re asking are tiny ($5 for a t-shirt, $1 for 10 postcards!) but they persist until you agree!

After the toilet break we had time for one more stop – at a site known as the Elephant Lodge.  Again, it’s super famous and it was really cool to see all the intricate carvings and imagine how everything was constructed many thousands of years ago. The entire Angkor area must have been such a site back when everything was being constructed – almost all of the temples were constructed in a 100 year period.

After the Elephant Lodge, we headed to our lunch stop.  Lunch today was included thanks to G-adventures support of the New Hope foundation, a site which runs yet another training restaurant, but also a school, medical care facility and social agency for under privileged families in Cambodia.  We ate an amazing meal including Crickets (which I opted out of!) before getting a talk from the New Hope staff about the facility and the good work they’re doing.  They take volunteers so if you’re looking for something good to do with your life, you could do worse than look them up!

So, just to point this out – it’s now just after lunch time and i’ve visited 3 amazing historic sites, seen sun rise, eaten food prepared by underprivileged students being educated by a NGO foundation, and now we’re heading back to the hotel to avoid the heat. Today was definitely a sense of achievement day!

At 6pm we headed back into Pub Street for a few more cocktails and dinner – which ended up with me heading out to join a younger Gadventures group (on a YOLO tour) for a few more drinks after the rest of the group headed out. I had visions of staying out super late, but my energy level was pretty low by 11 and decided to head back to the hotel and be sensible – we had another pre-7am start tomorrow!

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4th June – Day 16 – Gaffa tape to the rescue!

Today was a travel day – between Phnom Penh and Siem Reap.  Unlike the rest of the tour, we took a public bus service for this section.  The bus left Phnom Penh at 8, so we had a quick breakfast in the hotel before jumping onto a transfer bus, then connecting to a large coach for the 7 hour journey north.

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Banana Pancake for breakfast

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Front row seat!

The bus itself was fairly comfortable and had wifi (once they figured out they needed to plug in the router) as well as at seat power, but ultimately it was still a 7 hour coach ride and wasn’t the highlight of the tour!

Since Jackie and I got the front row seat (pre-reserved by Gadvantures for us), we ended up with the router in our seat area.  It kept coming unplugged, so I grabbed some gaffa tape which I had in my bag and taped it into the plug socket – the connection was pretty solid after that!

We stopped 3 times including a lunch stop at a local place where they served VERY fast and reasonable quality food to two bus loads in a matter of minutes. Impressive!

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Rest stop food

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My egg sandwich

I won’t write too much about the journey – who wants to hear about that – but safe to say 7 hours passed, there was rain, some scenery, and some boring bits.

When we arrived in Siem Reap, the bus dropped us in a kind of make shift bus station and we transferred to a Gadventures bus to go to our hotel.  The luggage was a bit of mayhem, since they unloaded the whole bus into one big pile, but it was quickly resolved.

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Rain on the route to Siem Reap

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Arriving in Siem Reap

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Baggage mayhem

 

Our hotel in Siem Reap is one that i’ve been really looking forward to since I saw the details of all the places we’re booked into.  It’s a resort hotel called the Royal Angkor Resort and it has a huge pool, as well as a beautifully scented public areas.  When we arrived we were shown to a welcome room where we sat for a few minutes, were presented with welcome drinks and cool towels and introduced to the features of the hotel – it felt very fancy!

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The reception room

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My room

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Balcony view

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The huge pool

After checking in and sorting things in the room, I headed down to the pool for a swim and a couple of cocktails – happy hour was from 3 till 7pm, perfect timing!  Almost the whole day had been consumed by the bus journey, so there was just time for us to head into down for dinner in the night.

At 6pm we met for the hotel shuttle into the city.  The shuttle was an elongated golf cart which was quite a vehicle for the 15-20 minute ride into the centre of Siem Reap.  Dek arranged for us to be dropped off at an area called Pub Street, which is kind of the social centre of Siem Reap.  It had a great vibe to it, and we quickly picked a bar offering $4 buy one get on free cocktails for some pre-dinner drinks.  Being on my own, I of course had to buy one and get one free… if you’re keeping count, thats 4 cocktails before dinner. Oops!

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Our shuttle

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Pub street, Siem Reap

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Save Water… Drink Beer… for $0.50!

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One of my cocktails

After a couple of pre-dinner cocktails, Dek took us to the Red Piano – a bar made famous because it was the hangout of Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie during the filming of the Tomb Raider movies and Angkor Thom. They had such an influence on the place that there is a Tomb Raider cocktail, created by Angelina, which of course I had to try.  The vibe was great in this part of town, with live music from some of the bars, an plenty of tourists around enjoying the ambiance.

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Angkor is the local beer

After dinner we shared a tuktuk or two back (at $3 for the 15 minute ride, nobody was complaining) and headed to bed.  Tomorrow, we have a 4:45am start…. remind me why I drank 5 cocktails with a start like that!

 

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3rd June – Day 15 – My Darkest Day

As mentioned yesterday, the hotel room in Phnom Penh was really pretty basic – and the air conditioning decided to suddenly work over efficiently at 2am, leading to me waking up freezing cold in the middle of the night! Still, I slept… On and off… During the night and we met at 7:30 for breakfast in the hotel.

Breakfast here is served in a seating area outside of the Fire Protection shop which oddly is located deep in the hotels courtyard. I guess it works for them, and hey – at least we know there’s plenty of fire extinguishers available if we need them!

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Scrambled egg and fatty bacon

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Fire extinguisher selection

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Our breakfast table

For breakfast here, there’s very little self service – one of the hotel staff brought a small piece of laminated paper with 5 options on it, and then disappeared to bring you whatever you ordered. Today I didn’t feel like negotiating so I ordered the Scrambled Eggs and Bacon and just left the bacon, which was really fatty anyway!

At 8 we met our tour guide for Phnom Penh – an expert local guide who knew all about the local events. Our time in Phnom Penh is centred around the Pol Pot massacres. The first stop was the Killing Fields at Choeung Ek – now advertised as a Genocidal Center.

If you’re not familiar with the Pol Pot stories – in the space of 4 years he came to power and almost 2 million Cambodian citizens were killed – either through killing fields or by starvation, sickness or torture and murder in prison. The whole story is pretty horrifying and feels incredible recent and relevant. The exact details of all of the history are still fairly unknown since much of the worst atrocities were carried out in remote locations, blindfolded and those committing the atrocities were also finally killed before the Vietnamese invaded and brought down the Pol Pot regime.

At the site that we visited, over 12,000 people were murdered – most of them without the use of guns since bullets were expensive. Our guide talked us through some of the methods of murder, the tortures imposed upon some of the women and children and the mass graves where people would see their final breath. I found this such a terrible and upsetting place to be, but was keen to understand all of the events and what had gone on.

I’ve put all the photos at the bottom of this article – some of them are quite upsetting. Please feel free to stop reading after the text, if you don’t want to see them.

Feeling subdued after the visit to the killing fields, our next stop was the prison known as S21 – originally called a ‘Re-education centre” – the official name now is Tuol Sleng Genocide Museum. This building started life as a high-school, before being repurposed by the Pol Pot regime into a prison. During the time of the regime there was little use for a school, since all children (well, all citizens) were expected to work in the land and educated people were eradicated. It was estimated that after the fall of the regime, only 15% of the people in Cambodia had received any sort of education – all those who had previously been educated were the targets of the regime and were eliminated.

Inside the museum, we walked between the four buildings where prisoners were kept. Conditions decreased as we progressed, from the building A known as the ‘VIP’ building (each prisoner had their own fairly sizeable room), through to cells of less than a meter in the later buildings. The stories of the conditions in the prison come primarily from the accounts of 5 survivors who were found alive hiding in a kitchen after the fall of the regime. Their tales are far too graphic to write here, but can easily be found with a Google search if you’re interested.

None of us made it all the way around the museum, with most of us ducking out before the third building. It was simply too much to hear and see the awful events that had gone on just a few years ago in this place.

After the museum, we all agreed that we needed a change in pace and Dek suggested a ‘blind massage’ – a local organisation runs massages staffed by blind people, called Seeing Hands. Most of the group made our way by a $2 tuktuk to the massage place, and booked ourselves in for a $7 massage. The massage was quite an experience – we were given cotton pyjamas to change into and then lay on a table in a room with around 6 other people, and our masseur came and joined us. There was no talking, just a really deep massage which was actually really good but lying in a dark room did have me thinking a lot more about the sites of the morning – perhaps reflection time wasn’t what was needed.

On the way back from the massage, our tuktuk driver insisted he knew where our hotel was and then proceeded to drive us the wrong way up our street. We spotted some house numbers which looked wrong, and turned him around, which led to more confusion as on the way back, the numbers seemed to be going in the wrong direction still… After 2 or 3 tries, we figured out where we are, but reading online afterwards it appears that in Phnom Penh, the street numbers are often not sequential and in fact there can easily be two or more places with the exact same number on the same street. People navigate there with cross-street numbers, so if you’re travelling there – try to learn the cross street of your hotel, not just the number!

Once we got back to the hotel, I treated myself to a western style Pizza for a late lunch before relaxing in the hotel. My laundry arrived back fully washed and folded, and I happily gave the hotel staff $4 for the laundry. It was a disappointment to find that the laundry place had written with pen on all of the labels of my clothes to identify my room number – not a nice discovery! Still, it’s done now and for $4 I didn’t expect a great service!

This evening I booked myself a separate activity to the rest of the group. Dek had arranged for everyone to go to a restaurant where they could try local creepy crawlies for dinner – which didn’t sound like my kind of thing. So instead, I booked Dine in the Dark.

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Dine in the Dark

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Dine in the Dark

If you’ve never heard of Dine in the Dark before – it’s a restaurant experience where you learn to experience life as a blind person would. It was a short walk from my hotel, so I headed there and ordered the vegetarian menu – there’s no choice about what you get, and half of the fun is discovering the food you’re presented with. It’s not a cheap option in Cambodia – $18 for the meal plus drinks – but you’re paying for the experience and supporting local blind people, so I was happy to pay it.

After ordering, I was asked to submit anything I had on my person which had a light – camera, phone and watch went into a locked box and I was given the key for the box. After this I was introduced to my waiter for the evening, Fredro. He introduced himself and asked me to place my hand on his shoulder and follow him.

He guided me to a staircase and upstairs, where the light level quickly fell off before we turned through a black velvet curtain into darkness, then through 2 more curtains before reaching complete black.

It was really surreal having absolutely no idea what was surrounding me. Fredro announced that we had reached my table, and I felt around to find my chair and establish how much space was there between the chair and the table – enough to sit without having to pull it out. I sat and Fredro then introduced me to the items on the table – including a napkin, knife, fork, spoon and water glass. I had to feel around to find each of these items but obviously finding them is important to eating dinner.

Shortly after sitting down, Fredro brought me a beer which I had ordered and we chatted a little bit – and then the food started to arrive. I won’t spoil the surprise by describing what I ate, but it was an amazing experience having to feel to find my plate, figure out what was on there and then how to eat it without knowing everything’s location. It was such a thought provoking experience, being unable to identify things by look meant everything was about touch.

After my 3 courses were finished, I realised one of the really big problems when it comes to blindness. I wanted to get the attention of a waiter, to let them know that I’d finished but it’s impossible to make eye contact in a blind world, and the waiters were talking amongst themselves which meant that speaking out would interrupt their conversation – something as a Brit I’m always loathed to do. In the end, that was my only option – and I let Fredro know that I was ready to leave, but not before I sat agonising for 15 minutes to try and communicate in a world of darkness.

After the meal, the staff presented a photograph of all the food which I’d eaten and it was really interesting to see the presentation of the dishes, which was completely irrelevant in my vision-less world. They also gave an opportunity to take a photo with my waiter, which you can see below.

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Me and my waiter, Fredro

I left the restaurant with my head thinking a lot about the events of the day – and the experiences I’d already had on the trip overall. Tonight I packed for the final move of the tour – tomorrow we travel to Siem Reap where we’ll end the tour. Can’t believe how quickly it’s gone!

The pictures from todays visits are on the next page, click Read More if you want to see them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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1st June – Day 13 – Tunnels, Traps and Tapioca

After a brilliant nights sleep in the wonderful Continental hotel Saigon, I headed for an early breakfast at 7:15 and was amazed at the huge buffet selection on offer. One great thing the French brought to Vietnam is bread – there were authentic French baguettes and pastries which were a welcome change to the usual scrambled egg buffets in most of our hotels.

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A truly ‘Continental’ breakfast

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Beautiful location for breakfast

At around 8 we met again with our local guide, Tiger, to head to the Cu Chi Tunnels – around a 2 hour journey outside the city. The bus ride was fairly boring but we had a chance to look out the window and see more of rural Vietnam, although we already did 8 hours on busses in Hanoi so this was beginning to feel monotonous rather than exciting. Tiger gave us some summaries of the Cu Chi tunnels whilst we travelled, and also offered us the option to visit a lacquered wood store for disadvantaged families, although after our negative experience of the statue place in Hanoi, we declined this offer and this seemed to upset Tiger.

We arrived at the tunnels and joined a sizeable queue to get into the entrance before Tiger took us to one side to begin our private tour. I have to say that this tour was actually fairly bad – it felt like Tiger was rushing us around, each time we stopped he would reel off a few facts about whatever we were looking at and then immediately walk us to the next location. There was a lot to see, and I can understand that it’s somewhat upsetting to discuss some of the history of the wars, but if you’re a tour guide you should probably be okay with discussing it.

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Rushing around Cu Chi tunnels

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Tiger on the run again

If you don’t know, the Cu Chi tunnels are a 200km tunnel system constructed by Vietnamese Communiststs (Viet Cong) to give them a hiding place from the American soldiers. They were pretty impressive, with 3 levels of tunnels upto 9 meters deep, as well as a series of traps which they constructed to catch the Americans. The traps in particular were really uncomfortable to look at – some involved really horrible injuries or deaths for the soldiers who were unfortunate to step on the wrong part of the jungle.

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A demo of the tiny spaces the vietnamese left for them to enter the tunnel system

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The place was crawling with millipedes

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A small exposed section of the tunnels

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A US army tank which was destroyed by Viet Cong

The whole tour took place in fairly thick jungle and the soundscape was punctuated by regular gunshot sounds from a shooting range at the mid-point where they offer the opportunity to pay to shoot some of the guns used in the war. I actually quite strongly disagreed with this offer, since it feels weird that the Vietnamese would encourage foreigners to shoot guns in a place where their own people spent so much effort to avoid the gunfire just a few years ago. The shots were about 35,000 dong per bullet, with a minimum charge of 10 bullets – making the activity not only immoral but also expensive. I declined this opportunity although a few of the group did take them up on this, and I winced as the deafening sounds came from their guns towards the targets.

Also on the tour we saw some of the ways that the Viet Cong were able to survive for days or even weeks in the tunnels – they had small kitchens set up with ventilation systems to distribute the smoke so that the Americans weren’t able to detect them. We were even given a chance to try the standard food they cooked – Tapioca root with salt, sugar and peanuts as a dipping sauce, as well as some green tea. This was actually pretty tasty, although I’m not sure I’d want to eat it every day for 3 weeks!

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Cu Chi tunnels, under ground. I lasted 40 meters before giving up due to the heat.

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Tapioca and peanut dip

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Uncle Ho

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A site plan

At the end of the tour, which seemed to come really quickly thanks to Tigers rushed displays, we found a gift shop and members of the group bought some beautiful wind chimes and things like that – I don’t have enough space in my bag for these big things, but I bought a round of beers for everyone (it was definitely my turn). We jumped back onto the bus and a couple of hours later were back at the hotel – around 2 hours before Dek had told us we would be back, which gave us a real indication of just how quickly we had been rushed around the tour. I wonder if our declining the Lacquered wood shop had really upset Tiger, or if perhaps he just didn’t really like us or something. Either way, we gave him a small customary tip but discussed with Dek afterwards how we felt about this part of the tour.

The rest of the day was recharge time, but Dek had helped me, Karl and Petra to book an optional activity – a Water Puppet show which is a traditional Vietnamese activity. We grabbed a taxi to the theatre (even the taxis are crazy cheap here – just over $1 for a 15 minute ride) and took our seats for a really fun hour of puppetry in a small lake constructed on stage. The show had a really simple story to it, which was provided in the program in English, Vietnamese, Chinese, Korean, French and a couple of other languages – yet we could easily enjoy the spectacle with the live band accompanying around 10 live puppeteers and their clever little puppets. It was impressive to see this, and also make links to the water fountain displays at the Wynn in Las Vegas which I’m sure used parts of this show as their influence.

After the water puppet show, I headed to the local backpacker street for a small dinner before going to the hotel. It was a really nice evening and Saigon is definitely a city I want to come back to and explore more – I can’t believe we move on to our next country tomorrow morning already!

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Some fried rice for dinner

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31st May – Day 12 – Good morning, Vietnam

After last nights fun cycle tour and dinner, I slept really well and woke up at 6am naturally. These mornings are really becoming normal now!
After a small breakfast at 7, we met in the hotel lobby at 8:15 to head to the airport for our flight to Saigon (Ho Chi Minh City). Dek had given us a little longer in the hotel than he normally would, so we had a short wait in the airport before the flight – I bought a small sandwich and some green tea because the in-flight meals haven’t exactly been glorious so far!

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A step up from the inflight options, believe me

During the flight I went through my Peru photos with Karl and Petra, who are considering a trip to Peru as their next adventure. It was fun to relive the memories of that trip and to share it with some new friends.

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Obligatory plane selfie

The flight was fairly short and as expected, we were presented with a terrible in flight meal. I enjoyed my egg sandwich instead, and shortly after we landed in Ho Chi Minh City, better known as Saigon. The city was renamed after the Vietnam war to honour the leader of the time, who still holds mountains of respect in the country.

One really weird thing about our arrival was that one of the first planes we saw when we touched down was a US air force transport plane.  It resounded with us just how monumental this could be, coming just a week after Barak Obamas visit in which he agreed to sell arms to the Vietnamese forces again. Perhaps this plane was carrying a shipment?

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An ominous delivery?

A short transfer in the airport and we were headed to our hotel – the Continental Hotel in District 1. District 1 is really fancy, and the hotel is stunning – it’s actually where all of the western journalists were based during the Vietnam war, so it’s got a pile of history itself. I was amused to see that Saigon is divided into districts, which reminded me of the Hunger Games – perhaps an unfortunate coincidence in a communist country.

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The continental hotel

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My room

Across the road from our hotel was an ATM and I easily withdrew 2 million dong to cover the next few days activities, then headed to my room to cool down before our first activity of the day. It’s really great how they pile these activities into travel days, so you’re not wasting any time in a new city.

At 3pm we met for our cyclo tour of the city – our second cyclo tour in as many days! Our guide in Saigon is called Tiger and he guided us around the city as we stopped in various locations. The first stop was at the Vietnam War Remnants museum, which had some US army helicopter and tanks outside. We were only given 30 minutes in the museum which was quite disappointing as it was nowhere near enough time to explore the whole place and in order to get a feel for it, we had to skim over a lot of the exhibits. It was actually pretty harrowing to read the local perspective on the war and hear some of the stories of the events of the war. I’m not going to cover too much of my opinion here, but there’s no denying that the after effects of the war are being felt by the Vietnamese people today and onwards.

Our next stop on the tour was “Reunification Palace” which has served as a royal palace as well as a political palace and was famous during the Vietnam war as the place where the gates were closed and helicopters lifted around a thousand Vietnamese out of the country during the ending of the war. We only had a chance for photos here before moving on with our Cyclos.

The next stop with our Cyclos was the Cathedral in Saigon which was built by the French in the style of Notre Dame. It’s really interesting how the occupants of these countries imposed their own religious style and beliefs upon the locals during the colonial times, and there are still many Catholics in Vietnam because of the French occupancy.

After our photos and explanations at the cathedral, we crossed the road to the Post Office – our final stop on the tour. The Post Office was historically very important in Vietnam and again the building style was very European, yet in the centre of the building was a huge portrait of Ho Chi Minh. Now it’s a tourist attraction, with tons of small shops selling Vietnamese souvenirs at inflated prices.

Once we were photo’d out, our Cyclos brought us back to the hotel where we had a couple of hours to cool off and change before dinner. The hotel is in a really great location, so I was happy to relax there but used my time to go out to a local coffee shop.

At 7 we met Dek for a short walk to our dinner location – the famous Pho 2000, which was made famous by Bill Clinton visiting in the year 2000 (not sure what the name was before then) – this was seen by the Vietnamese as a huge sign of respect and the start of rebuilding their relations with the Americans. In the restaurant (which was a little place up the stairs at the back of a coffee shop), there are photos of Bill Clintons visit and the table where he sat has details of what they ordered. I chose the Vegetable Pho and a pineapple juice, and the food was really good – authentic and flavourful. Thankfully that place hasn’t turned into a huge tourist trap, and there were locals enjoying the food too.

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Pho 2000

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Pho fit for a president

After our dinner we walked around the Night Market where the sellers seemed really desperate and pushy – grabbing onto us and trying to lure us into their stalls where they all sell pretty much the same t-shirts. I like the Vietnam t-shirts but don’t really want to be pushed into it, so I’ll probably come back tomorrow alone when hopefully they will be a little less pushy!

For our journey tomorrow, Dek has warned us that there aren’t as many lunch opportunities so we stopped in a little convenience store to buy some snacks for the journey – I bought a pack of dried pineapple and some drinks, plus a bottle of ‘English Breakfast Tea’ – mainly because I really want to see how awful it is!

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It was predictably disgusting

It’s another 8am start tomorrow, so we headed to bed early-ish. I like Saigon, it’s got a real buzz about it.

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May 29th – Day 10 – Ha… Long Day!

Today was another early start – a 5:45am alarm to be precise. Don’t come on this holiday if you like lie- ins!!

I had requested an iron from the hotel the night before, and was told they would bring it at 6, since the housekeeping staff weren’t working at night. It never came, so I put on a crinkled shirt and went down for breakfast. These hotel breakfasts are so impressive but I’m eating less and less at them- I guess it’s natural that you don’t need to overindulge when each day there is more and more amazing food!

Duc Lee introduces himself

Duc Lee introduces himself

At 6:30 we met our guide for Hanoi and Ha Long Bay – Duk Lee.  He’s local to Hanoi and works for a third party tour company who G-adventures contract in Vietnam (Wide Eye Tours). He arrived a little bit late so we were already getting onto the minibus before his introduction, but we had a short ride before the first stop – Ho Chi Minhs mausoleum. It was only a few minutes ride from the hotel, and once we got out of the bus we had a lot of queuing and waiting around for permission to go for our visit.

The Ho Chi Minh mausoleum

The Ho Chi Minh mausoleum

Me at the Mausoleum

Me at the Mausoleum

Soldiers at the mausoleum

Soldiers at the mausoleum

Delivering flowers for Ho Chi Minh

Delivering flowers for Ho Chi Minh

The flowers in place

The flowers in place

Duc Lee gives us information about the national pride in Ho Chi Minh

Duc Lee gives us information about the national pride in Ho Chi Minh

It was an amazing place to visit. We didn’t have time to actually go into the mausoleum itself, since the queue can be 3-4 hours even if you arrive at 7am – instead we just visited the outside which in itself was imposing and impressive. The building was designed by the Russians and it had a truly communist feel. Visitors travel from across Vietnam daily to pay their respects to Ho Chi Minh and to deliver flowers and gifts to him. They have a special ‘VIP’ queue which is only a couple of hours, for those from hill tribes who make a special effort to get there – sometimes travelling 2-3 days to get to the mausoleum.  It’s hard to overemphasise the presence Ho Chi Minh has here, even posthumerously.

Our visit was relatively short since we had a long journey ahead – 4 hours infact, to get to Ha Long Bay. By 7:45 we were on the road, settling down in our air conditioned bus for the long slog.

En-route we stopped at a rest stop run by a statue manufacturer, who tried to sell us huge statues and offered shipping around the world. I bought some water.

En-route we stopped at a rest stop run by a statue manufacturer, who tried to sell us huge statues and offered shipping around the world. I bought some water.

The bus ride wasn’t the most amazing part of the trip – I processed some of the photos from earlier and in the trip and watched a movie on my iPad, as well as napping a little. It was interesting to see all the streets of Vietnam passing by, with their motorcycle obsession and amazing use of space – there were all sorts of shops on the road side, hoping for weary travelers to stop by and buy whatever weird thing they were selling.

After just over 4 hours we arrived at the pier for our boat cruise in Ha Long Bay. There were hundreds of boats parked up and our bus drove past most of them to arrive at our cruise, which was parked up right at the end. I half expected to end up in a dinghy after we passed some huge cruise boats and the boats decreased in size but Duc explained that our boat is only for us, so it’s quite a small one since we’re only 10 people.

Arriving at the boat

Arriving at the boat

Boarding our ride for the next 2 days

Boarding our ride for the next 2 days

A welcome drink

A welcome drink

After a quick toilet stop on land, we boarded our junk boat for the overnight cruise.The junk boats name comes from the French Junk, not the English Junk – they’re wooden boats. We were presented with a welcome drink made with passion fruit and then we were shown to our rooms before we embarked on our journey.

My room on the junk boat

My room on the junk boat

I had my own room, complete with two single beds, life jacket, hammer, torch and private bathroom.  It was actually pretty cosy and I settled down there for a few minutes before our lunch was served on the middle deck.

As well as being crew to the boat, the cruise staff also doubled as waiting staff, barman and chef and the food was actually really impressive – fresh seafood for most and tofu for me, with rice, vegetables and lots of other things. By the end of lunch I felt stuffed!

Lunch is served

Lunch is served

Lunch in progress

Lunch in progress

As we ate lunch, the boat cruised out to the famous islands and we all agreed that this was probably the most spectacular scenery we’d all eaten in.  The meal was accompanied with a free glass of wine, and then we had a choice to buy more from the bar if we wanted – the barman kept a tab for each of our rooms and we could settle at the end, just like a hotel.

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Ha Long Bay really is spectacular

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Steve and Fred chill out on deck

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We had boats in front and behind us, but everyone kept their distance so it didn’t feel crowded

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Some of the islands have names, such as this one which is meant to be a cockerels head

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Boat selfie with my terrible hat

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Steve offered to take my photo with a nice island behind me and I ended up with this

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It would be rude not to try the Ha Long beer whilst in such an amazing setting

Once lunch was done we got some really nice relaxing cruise time in with the stunning scenery accompanying us.  Dek and Duc (I only just realised that when writing this up) interjected occasionally with facts and comments about the bay (there are over 1300 islands!) but in general it was just chilled out and relaxing – a huge change from the hustle and bustle of Hanoi the night before.

In the early afternoon our boat pulled in to a small habour and we disembarked to go visit the Thien Cung caves, which are a small set of caves open to visitors for 50,000 dong ($2) per visit.

The caves were discovered a couple of decades ago and when they were found, they were occupied by monkeys.  Now they’ve been cleared out and lit and turned into a pretty spectacular tourist attraction, which was totally unexpected! The cool but humid air was a welcome break from the heat of the bay too.

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Enetting the caves, we had no idea what to expect beyond some rocks…

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The first chamber was quite cool, but a fairly normal cave

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As we progressed deeper the colours became more vibrant and my selfies became more arty

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The ceiling was amazing

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Enetting the third chamber the vista was incredible

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The humidity created a constant mist near the entrance which looked so cool, it was like being a psychedelic kids dream

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The cave actually went quite far back

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The top of the cave (near the exist) gave a really incredible view of Ha Long Bay

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Obligatory “I was actually there” photo

Unfortunately whilst enjoying the caves, one of our group (Fred) stepped backwards off a small pathway and fell and hurt his wrist.  We won’t know how serious it is until we get back to land tomorrow, but he seems to be in quite a lot of pain – but Dec responded brilliantly taking him down to the boat immediately and getting it on ice, whilst Duc looked after us through the rest of the cave. I really admire a company like Gadventures in a situation like this, taking care and calming the situation whilst still ensuring that everyone is enjoying themselves (even Fred seemed to be enjoying himself although with a slightly limp wrist once we got back on the boat – I suspect a break 😦 )

After the caves, we had a choice of optional activities – kayaking or being rowed by someone else into a small lagoon.  Jackie and I chose to do the kayaking, whilst the rest of the group took the rowing option – wimps! The kayaking was so much fun!!! We jumped into the kayak which was brought alongside the boat by a local guy and then off we went – through a small tunnel and into the lagoon.  We actually got to kayak for ages – around 90 minutes – for 250,000 dong ($12!)

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Jackie had the front of the kayak

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Our ‘instructor’ couldn’t speak English and kept his distance – pretty sure he was just there to save our lives if we did something dumb

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Kayaking was amazing!

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Jackie in the tunnel

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Me in silhouette in the tunnel

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In the lagoon chilling

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Jackie jumped in, even though swimming isn’t really allowed there

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I promise I didn’t push her!

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The sunset started whilst we were out on the water, it was so beautiful

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Towards the end we found another tunnel and some amazing rock structures.

By the time kayaking was finished, it was almost sunset and Jackie and I had to chase the main boat back to our mooring position to finish our kayaking adventure.  This was by far one of my highlights of the trip – even if I and my camera were absolutely soaking by the end of it.

After we showered and cleaned up from the kayaking it was time for dinner, which was similar to lunch but still impressive being served on a boat in the middle of the ocean.  We all enjoyed it and as we ate, the sun set to give us amazing vista of the other boats in the area. We finished dinner with some drinks from the bar and a spot of squid fishing until the generator on the boat had a bit of a fit and the light to attract the squid conked out, putting an abrupt end to that activity.

My favourite part of the night was heading up to the top deck sun loungers to lie and look up to the stars.  Since we were so far from land, the sky was clear and there were thousands of stars in the sky to enjoy.  You don’t get a photo of that though, because a moving boat doesn’t make an awesome tripod.

What a wonderful and relaxing day. I went to bed super happy.

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Goodnight all

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Relections in the bay

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May 28th – Day 9 – Mountain, Millionaires and Motorcycles

In the peak season, the tour would move on to Vietnam in the morning on this day, but since we’re travelling in the off -season, Lao Airlines only flies in the afternoons to Hanoi, so we had a free morning in Luang Prabang. I was pretty happy about this since I’ve really enjoyed the pace of life in Luang Prabang and I wanted to explore their most famous site, the Phousi Mountain (don’t say it too quickly!).  At the top of the mountain is a small temple which can be seen from all over the town, and it offers spectacular views of the two rivers which converge just outside of Luang Prabang.

I started the day with an early breakfast, around 7, before heading out to the mountain before the heat of the day hit. The base of the mountain path was a short walk from the hotel, and I was able to make good time heading up – after paying my 20,000 kip entrance fee. Almost every tourist attraction seems to charge the same here!

It was 309 steps up to the top of the mountain, but it was worth it – I had the top to myself and could see all of the town, the rivers and the small temple as well. The sense of achievement in doing this was also worth it!

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A view of the river and Luang Prabang from the mountain

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Top of the mountain selfie

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The other side of the town

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The temple at the top

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No idea what this purple leaf is but it was really vibrant and visible throughout the town

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It was a steep walk up the mountain

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Selfie after making it back down

On the way back down I decided to go for another Lao coffee, having enjoyed it the day before. There was some confusion in the shop who seemed to think I wanted a take away coffee and gave me the boiling hot coffee and condensed milk in a plastic bag, like a goldfish at the fair. After clarifying my request, I was quickly brought a new one in a glass and enjoyed it just as much as the first, although I didn’t dare to try and communicate about the doughnut !

Once I got back to the hotel I quickly packed before going for a swim in the beautiful hotel pool. It was still not even 8:30! The early mornings on this tour really mean the day packs in things… I swam for half an hour and by that point some of the others emerged from their rooms.

Since it was so early, I went back to the room for a little cool off and a nap before checking out from the hotel.  I walked back into the town and explored a little of the old town, hunting out some gift shops and stopping for lunch in a tourist restaurant called The Pizza, which served terrible over priced pizza and drinks but I wanted to be gentle to my stomach after the upset yesterday – I also ordered ginger tea which seemed to help.  After I ordered the olive pizza, the waiter dashed out of the shop to a neighbouring supermarket and came back in with a pack of olives and some ginger. Got to love small towns!

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Olive pizza

With a couple of hours remaining in Luang Prabang once lunch was over, I went into a coffee shop for a cold drink and some aircon as well as free wifi… Honestly this day was a bit unnecessary but the flight schedules had determined we should stay until 3pm.

At 3 we regrouped and headed out to the airport, where check-in was smooth and allowed us a little more waiting before we boarded Laos Airlines QV313 to Hanoi.  The flight was pretty much a mirror image of our flight from Chiang Mai – an ATR plane, terrible box meal and a 45 minute hop.

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Laos airlines selfie

When we landed in Hanoi the sky was incredible – the clouds were so dark and low, it was clear a storm was about to hit and shortly after we left the airport, we were presented with a wonderful thunderstorm. The Vietnamese visa process for a UK passport holder was super easy- no paperwork at all, just handing over my passport and getting a stamp at the border. Some of the others had spent upwards of $200 on their Vietnam visas!

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Vietnams visa is somewhat simple after the crazy Laos ones

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Our luggage collection

In the airport I also changed some US Dollars into Vietnamese dong and once again became a millionaire – $1 was worth 22,240 dong so my $100 gave me 2.2 Million dongs!

Our trip to the hotel was in a nice big comfortable bus and we got to see a bit of the hubbub of Hanoi – our hotel was quite central in the city on ‘silk street’ (fittingly the hotel was the Golden Silk Hotel).  The streets of Hanoi are organised by what is sold there – so there is glasses street, coffee street, and beer street. Quite an efficient way of shopping, unless you want a lot of different things at once!

During our bus ride Dek gave us some tips about Vietnam – a country of 90 million people, and Hanoi – the capital city with over 8 million people and over 4 million motorcycles.  The constant ‘beep beep’ of the motorcycles and cars weaving in and out was infectious and I couldn’t wait to get out and start exploring! We only got one night in Hanoi before our next destination, so we went on a short walk to Deks favourite local restaurant – called 96 Restaurant. Dek said they have one as well called 69 -although that sounds like a whole different dinner to me!

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Another hotel, another massive bed!

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Pineapple juice

Crossing the roads in Hanoi is something of an art form, as there is never really a break in the traffic – you just kind of ‘go for it’ when you want to cross, and the traffic avoids you. At first it sounds scary, but the more you do it the easier it becomes.

At 96 Restaurant I had some fresh vegetable spring rolls and tofu with satay sauce,as well as a fruit juice and it cost 250,000 dong! That feels like a lot, but it’s really about $20.

Once back at the hotel, and safely across the roads again, I quickly replaced my day pack into an overnight pack since we couldn’t bring our full bags for the next day trip to Ha Long Bay.  Tomorrow would be another early start, setting off at 6:30 – so I got an early night again. Excited for tomorrow though – Ha Long Bay is one of my reasons for booking the trip!

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May 27th – Day 8 – Monks, Caves and Coffee

This morning we met at 5:20am, before sunrise, which meant a 4:30 alarm (followed by a 4:35 alarm, a 4:40 alarm, a 4:45 alarm and a cold shower…). The reason for our early rising? Today we were to give Alms to the monks who live at the various temples around Luang Prabang.

The daily ritual is the way that the monks in the area receive food and gifts from the local community. Every morning at sunrise the monks walk a route around the city with collection baskets and locals give gifts of sticky rice, crackers and sometimes treats. It’s something of a tourist event now, but there were still plenty of locals continuing the tradition even in down-season.

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Our 5:20am walk

We headed quickly from our hotel to the Main Street, around a 5 minute walk, and took our seats on some small plastic stools. By each stool was a large basket of sticky rice, provided by GAdventures as part of the tour.  Shortly after we sat down, the first of 5 temples worth of monks began walking past us.  Dek instructed us in how to create balls of sticky rice and place them into the donation baskets. The rice was incredibly hot, which made it difficult to handle, but it was an amazing experience to provide for the monks who live their lives from donations.

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The monks arrive at sunrise

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Prepped and ready at 5:30

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Me, giving alms

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The procession of monks

In total 5 temples passed us in the space of about 15 minutes, and a lot of the experience for me was reflection on the life of a monk – taking their spirituality into mind and understanding more about how much it means to them that these traditions continue.

After giving alms, Dek led us through the local market in Luang Prabang where we were warned we would see a lot of unusual products. This market was really for local people, not like the tourist markets we’d been shown so far. As I mentioned yesterday, Laos people are really resourceful when it comes to food and eat pretty much whatever is going in the area – and that included a lot of fish (in various states of disembodiment), snakes, lizards, bags of animal blood and animal bile, snails, frogs and a thousand other things you wouldn’t expect to find as food! It was really interesting to consider how much these people take from their resources which we would normally disgard or not consider as part of our diet. We’re incredibly lucky to be able to pick and choose what we eat, but we are also incredibly wasteful.

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Some stuff was actually packaged

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Chillis of all types

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Some sort of lizard for sale at the market

With our stomachs now rumbling even though it was only 7am, we were offered a chance to try Lao coffee – a local speciality which is prepared with condensed milk at the bottom of a glass followed by strong thick coffee poured on top.  It was served to us outside of a local coffee shop, with a small fried doughnut in an H shape for 6000 kip – less than $1.

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Lao coffee

Just after the coffee, we headed back to the hotel for real breakfast before preparing to leave at 8am for our next adventure.

At 8 we got onto the minibus to head upstream – this was the easier option of two we were given (the other one involved an extra 90 minutes on a boat floating upstream).  The 30 minute drive gave us all a chance for a short nap before we arrived at what was described as a rice whiskey village. This was a local village by the edge of the water where tourist boats stop and the locals sell their rice whiskey, as well as other hand made products – I bought a terrible hat (to match my terrible hat from Peru) but avoided trying the rice whiskey which had scorpions soaking in it (to add to the flavour, or just to make it look scary – I couldn’t really tell!)

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Rice Whiskey lady

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Styling out my new weave/Burberry $3 hat

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Snake rice whiskey

Once the locals had finished convincing us to buy things, we boarded our boat and started a short 30 minute trip on the river to our destination – the Pak Ou Caves.

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Our boat

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River photo

These caves are famous for housing over 2500 Buddha statues, a sort of cave temple I guess. The caves are split into two – the lower cave is easily accessible from our boat and the upper cave is a few hundred steps up the hill.  I decided to do both, and it was really spectacular. The lower cave is well lit and interesting, but the upper cave was pitch black and meant I needed a head torch to see all the statues. Jaqueline and I explored and felt like we were in something out of an Indian Jones movie. It was so hot at the top having climbed the stairs, I was glad to get back down and drink some cool water on the return boat ride to Luang Prabang.

The boat ride back took about an hour but we landed right in the centre of Luang Prabang, just behind the Royal Palace Museum. It was a short bus ride back to the hotel and we were able to relax for the rest of the day.

First on my priority list was a massage which I took in the hotel spa.  It wa a little more expensive than the massage places in town, but still only $20 for an hour!

My stomach wasn’t feeling so good so I opted to just make a short trip to the store and bought some snack foods to have in my room before napping and sleeping off my funny tummy. After all, I had woken up at 4:30!

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My snacks

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May 26th – Day 7 – Ashes, Fishes and Frogs

We begin our tale with a joyful 4am wake up from a friendly mosquito, who decided to become acquainted with my base of my foot.  And my knee. And the side of my face.  Stupidly, I didn’t consider mosquito protection (hey, I’m in a hotel) before going to bed – but apparently there was a little mosquito repellent by the door which you’re meant to turn on before going to sleep.  Hey, you live and learn – at least I’m taking malarials and the bites aren’t particularly itchy, so I think I lucked out.

We had an 8am scheduled start, so I got up at 6:45 and took a shower… A cold one, since the hotel water system doesn’t seem to offer warm water unless you have the patience of a saint.  I promise the day gets better from here on in!

The view at breakfast

Breakfast buffet

Breakfast is served in the little hotel restaurant by the lily pond.  It was again buffet style, but really nice local dishes – coconut pancakes, papaya and dragon fruit, etc. I really enjoyed the watermelon juice.

At 8 we met to start our day tour, and meet our local guide for Luang Prabang. Our local guide is Yang – he works for a local agency which GAdventures use in Laos and he’ll be with us for the days in Laos. We got a quick briefing in the hotel then jumped on the minibus for our 2 minute ride to the first temple of the day – Wat Visoun Narath.  This is quite an old temple in Luang Prabang and definitely a change from the ones we visited in Thailand –  it was old and dusty rather than the bright shiny gold we saw in Thailand. There wasn’t much to see here, a few boats which are used for annual boat races (the monks don’t race, that’s a shame – I’d have loved to see monks racing!)

Wat Visoun or something like that

A view of Luang Prabangs famous hilltop temple

Yvonne checked out the ‘toilet’

The Watermelon Stupa

Inside the temple

Dark and Dusty Buddhas

More Buddhas

Bells for sale

My guide book says that this is the eldest working temple in Laos and was built in 1513.

At this temple were a few small local stalls and I bought myself some brass bells, which will go really well with my hanging boat I bought in the floating islands in Peru. These cost 100,000 kip – which sounds like a lot but it’s basically £10.

After the first temple visit, we jumped onto the minibus for a 3 minute ride to the next temple – Wat Xiengthongratsavoravihanh. Or at least that’s what the sign says.  The G adventures app calls it Wat Xien Thong, which was a Royal temple when Laos was a monarchy led country – it houses amongst other things the ashes of the ‘last king’ of Laos, and many other treasures.  There were a lot of reminders here of the shift from Monarchy to Communist rule and it was interesting to learn this background before our next stop.

Wat Xien Thong

Golden Temple

More dusty Buddhas

Reclining buddha lives in here

Beautiful glass inlays in the wall

More beauty

I loved the look of this little lotus

Shortly after Wat Xien Thong, we headed to the Royal Museum in Luang Prabang. No photos were allowed inside here, but it was fascinating to see how the history of the monarchy is documented until 1975, but after that point there is no mention whatsoever. A highlight for me was seeing two Laos flights combined with fragments of moon rock donated by Richard Nixon to the Laos royal family in 1969 and 1972 – the flags travelled to the moon on Apollo XII and XVII.  Our guides explained that at the time the US was supporting the Laos people as part of the Vietnam war (Laos had both civil and involvement with the Vietnam conflicts, plus was occupied for a long time by the French).

The temple at the Royal Palace Museum

Proof I was really there!

A close up on the building apex, showing the Laos symbol of 3 elephants to represent the 3 tribes which formed Laos

Yang, our Laos guide

After a busy cultural morning exploring these sites, we headed back to the hotel for a 2 hour lunch break at the hotel – nobody was particularly hungry so I grabbed a protein bar and cooled off.

At 13:00 we met to head to the Kungsi Waterfall Park, which was a 45 minute minibus ride along some fairly windy (and at times, bouncy) roads.  The park was interesting, since it had both the waterfalls but also a Bear rescue park.

Kuangsi Waterfall Park

The beautiful waterfalls

The waterfalls themselves were stunning – slightly green in colour due to the lime in the rock, but clear and flowing water led to some amazing photo opportunities.

Photo opportunities at the top

Fred swimming

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Classic waterfall shot

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The calm pool below

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Beautiful view

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Are you bored of waterfall photos yet?

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Portrait format works too

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Steve and Yvonne check out the pool

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Petra and Karl

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Fred and Carol

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Petra

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Another me at the pool shot

The top of the waterfall is reserved for photos, whilst the bottom is the swimming area. I brought my swim stuff and changed in the fairly simple changing rooms (where the lock didn’t work) – before stepping into the water. The water itself was great, but I found the fish quite unpleasant since they seemed to be the same type of fish as the Fish Massage place in Thailand – they really wanted to attack you if you stood still too long! I splashed around a bit in the water, but got out before the others which also gave me a chance to shoot some photos after I dried off.

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Fred and Carol

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Some people had a lot more fun

It was a nice refreshing break from the heat, and definitely a change of pace from our temple-heavy first half of the day.

We had a brief look at the bear park, but the only ones who were being photogenic were slightly artificial:

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This bear didn’t even acknowledge me

Little bit fake

Little bit fake

An unphotogenic real bear

An unphotogenic real bear


At the bottom of the hill, I treated myself to a Cornetto before we got onto the bus for our trip back to the hotel.

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Bottom of the waterfall cornetto

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Retail therapy again

Once back, we had another 2 hour break to chill before dinner – this time on the other side of the town.To get to our dinner location, we took a Tuk Tuk and managed to fit 8 people on there – costing 6,000 kip each (75p!)

A Tuk Tuk for 9 people

Dinner was in a restaurant called Tamarind and was traditional Laos style food. If anyone ever says traditional Laos food to you, the easiest way to imagine it is… Whatever they can find. Literally. The menu featured river weeds, frogs, all sorts of stuff. They’re extremely resourceful, but maybe not catering hugely to our western expectations. I decided to opt for a Laos Omelette together with a Lemongrass and Lime Granita (cocktail).

After dinner I decided to go check out a local bar alone, which was great fun – Luang Prabang is a pretty calm and low risk city, and I got chatting  to some locals and ended up taking a motorcycle ride back to the hotel after the bars closed.

Early start tomorrow, since we’re getting up to give alms to the monks at 5am… Time to sleep. Tick Tock.

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